Self Publishing…Is It Worth It?

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There they were. Those two words you thought would never happen. Six little letters. You type slowly and reverently:

The End.

The act of completing a novel is huge. Of the billions of people on the planet we are in a very small, select group of Homo sapiens. Soak up the ambiance because shortly you come to the next gargantuan phase of your book: publishing.

You can have your book published on Amazon within a few days. You can use their cover designer for free. You just upload the pdf, collect your ISBN and POOF you’re published. You can do it in your underwear, or less. Clickity clack – baddaboom baddabing. AUTHOR!

Ooooooor, you can compose a query letter, a synopsis and prep a few select gorgeous pages of your work and try courting the shy and elusive literary agent or traditional publisher. And then await the rejections! I am in a group on Facebook that celebrates the Rejection Letter. Mostly they are pre-written form letters and ironically sometimes contain typos.

There is also a deep, dark secret that transpires at bookstores and libraries the world over. [TRIGGER ALERT] Every bookstore and library participate in the culling of books. Books — pages toiled over and written in blood by a writer — get DUMPED. Sometimes the get purchased by paper recycling company, some take truckloads to the land fills. It’s gruesome. Mass graves for literary endeavor.

I’m at a cross-roads. I’ve completed my novel. I can testify that it is definitely “not bad”. It’s a literary fiction manuscript. No vampires. No spacesuits. It’s about….well, here  you can read about it and see what I mean. I had this intense urge to get my manuscript through my editor’s process. I had a drive to finish, to get those pages to Amazon. And then once I was all done I sat with my novel…digitized into a pdf…and I became suddenly aware of relegating my book to the culled pile. Or worse, it never gets to the culled pile because my three friends didn’t have money to buy it and it just sits there, a victim of a lack of marketing and distribution.

Some reports suggest that less than 1% of authors on Amazon create revenue of $50 per day or more. But wait! Use Ads!! That’s right, start paying for your novel to be placed more successfully. It’s maddening.

So here I sit with my little pdf, working on pdf #2 and I’m considering all of the above. I believe I am going to wait for traditional publishing.

I don’t know…I really don’t.

For more reading try these: Claude Forthomme’s BlogNew York Times, The Guardian, Amazon KDP Support Chat

Query Letter Workshop

The Sandpaper Crew, an online beta reader group and Introvert PRESS, are co-hosting a Query Letter workshop on July 8th, 2017. The workshop is for people with current query letter looking for input and recommendations for improvement. The event will last for a 24 hours. It will allow you to post your query letter and receive suggestions from a diversity of viewpoints. We have editors, writers, readers and teachers, all ready to help with constructive criticism.  The Sandpaper Crew is a safe place!

Normally the Sandpaper Crew is a secret group, but we are opening up for the days leading up to the workshop so those associated with Introvert PRESS can find us on Facebook.

Remember the cardinal rule of criticism: take what you like, leave what you don’t.

The following day you can post your updated Query Letter for final applause, and hopefully make a few connections in the Indie Author world along the way.

Here is a link to the event. If you click on “interested” or “going” you will receive notification about details as they shape up.

Grace Harney’s Advice on KDP Select

First of all, what is KDP Select? It’s pretty unlikely that you don’t know already what this is, but for the sake of full disclosure and those that don’t know, it’s basically a 3-month, optional contract you can enter into with Amazon. If you’re like me, and you have just one book– –don’t do it! […]

via Enrolling Your Only Book in Kindle Select = 3 Months of Regret. Here’s Why. — Grace Harney

Monolith

Hello folks — here’s a chance for a short story submission. Monolith will be accepting short stories starting in June via Monolith. For all the details you can join Creative Writers on Facebook for details. Post questions if you need more info and cannot find it.

Antony M Copeland

I recently had a hare-brained idea to make an anthology. That’s a short-story collection in case anyone knows. Have you ever had a nagging thought in your head saying, “That doesn’t seem too hard? I bet even I could do that!”? In my case, it rapidly evolved from “Maybe I should try?”, through “Do it do it do it do it do it…”, to suddenly finding myself posting this in the Creative Writers group on Facebook:

Anthology

Soon the group was discussing the idea at length, getting excited and helping me pick out a font for the cover.  Before long the group had a brand new pinned post and I was challenging the group to coming up with a cover image that would be appropriate for both the series title, Monolith, and the theme of book one: New Beginnings.

Here are some of the early mock-ups for the front cover:

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IntrovertPRESS Author Spotlight: Rob Cooke

Rob Cooke’s Author Spotlight on IntrovertPRESS

Moonshiner’s Legacy     Sara’s Swamp Blues

Coming soon: The Lost Song of Miriam Landry

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Rob Cooke wrote early scenes of Moonshiner’s Legacy while undergoing treatment for cancer. He took his kids to the library, checked every book about the era in his novels and built the story one page at a time. The whole family was involved. From those research adventures with his kids, his series began. Moonshiner’s Legacy starts with Bo Barnum and his pursuits of handling the family moonshine business. Sara, his daughter, and granddaughter to a Creole Indian, is the focus of Sarah’s Swamp Blues.

Rob’s stories unfold with dynamic roots growing into the deep Southern culture of 1920’s Arkansas and Louisiana. Receiving 5-star reviews, Sara’s Swamp Blues continues the legacy into the violence and tumult of the 1950’s. Rob himself is from Nebraska and has a passion for Depression Era themes, especially the music of that time period. He is also a budding guitar, banjo and harmonica player.

Connect with Rob here. Please re-post and re-tweet to support Rob!

Thanks for visiting the IntrovertPRESS site. We are pleased to spotlight our authors and their literary ventures. If you would like to see the authors supported by IntrovertPRESS click here.

To ISBN or Not ISBN.

Self publishing? Need an ISBN? CreateSpace will give you an ISBN for FREE! Woo hoo!

But wait, if CreateSpace or other POD’s give me an ISBN (International Standard Book Number) – what’s the drawback? ISBN’s assigned to you by CreateSpace are “CreateSpace Assigned ISBN’s”. In other words it’s a place holder used only within Amazon marketing matrix.

But there are some options if you use CreateSpace:

  1. The option above, CreateSpace Assigned ISBN
  2. Custom Universal ISBN (for $99)
  3. Or you can provide your own ISBN purchased from an ISBN broker

Holy Crap…$99! That’s expensive…isn’t it? Actually for a universal ISBN, no – it isn’t. Arguably, the top ISBN broker is a company named Bowker. They sell a single ISBN for $125. The feature that most people use at Bowker is their group purchase option. They sell ten ISBN;s for $295, 100 ISBN’s for $575 or 1000 ISBN’s for $1500.

Why spend the money?

Here’s why.

  1. With a CreateSpace (or other POD) you are not the publisher, they are. Your book may immediately be disregarded by bookstores and potential reviewers as a vanity press project. I know when I was shopping my novel around to book stores they wouldn’t consider it if it had a CreateSpace ISBN.
  2. If you own the ISBN, you can move your book to a different printer if needed. Let’s say sales start taking off and you want to have copies on hand for book signings, you will have to pay CreateSpace the retail value for books. You cannot move it to a private printer for a run of prints to stock your book fair, book signings or public events. You will need to pay Amazon for your book!
  3. Lastly, buying your own ISBN’s means your book is listed with many retailers, libraries, Bowker Books In Print, Bookwire, as well as online services like Google Books, Apple’s iBooks, Chegg and the New York Times. Having your own ISBN gets your book OUT THERE!

So with my first novel coming out next month, I’m going to purchase ten ISBN’s. If anyone associated with IntrovertPRESS wants their own ISBN I’m happy to share. I would even be open to pooling resources or using crowd-sourcing to raise fund for ISBN’s. If you use your own ISBN, you can use IntrovertPRESS as your “publisher” so it looks like you are a traditionally published book.

We’re an author-netowrking site…let’s network!

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Even Carrie Had a Prom Date

The origin of IntrovertPRESS is a selfish one. Upon completing my novel and not having a traditional publishing contract I was faced with the Indie Author conundrum:

  1. I wrote a book
  2. I now want to sell the book
  3. Commence bashing head into desk

It’s a bit like getting yourself all gussied up on a Saturday night and then hoping a date will materialize at your door.  It is infuriating, even Carrie had a prom date.

So I created IntrovertPRESS to accomplish a few things:

  1. Make me feel like I’m actually DOING something to market my book
  2. Give my book a traditional publisher feel
  3. Create a network to put my book in front of buyers
  4. Garner a peer review of my novel until I land a qualified industry review
  5. See #1

In addition, I’m going to purchase my own ISBN so I can put my book on local bookstore shelves. The local paper has agreed to do a book review of my novel, so — assuming it is positive — my book will have a local push. If anyone else is interested in purchasing ISBN’s for their work, the costs are far more reasonable when you purchase in bulk:

  • $125 – 1 ISBN
  • $250 – 10 ISBNs – if IntrovertPRESS buys 10, super cheap to IP members
  • $575 – 100 ISBNs – super cheaper here!
  • $1000 – 1000 ISBNs – super cheapest…ISBN’s all around bartender!

Apparently buying ISBN’s is like buying mayonnaise, the 5 gallon vat of condiment is cheaper in bulk — and so it goes for literary birthmarks.

Respond if you are interested in joining our band of merry authors.